Where things stand at the moment

I had a 600-word vignette called Domestic Bliss which picked up the Twilight Sparkle/Desert Brush story from Somepony New after about six weeks; after staring at it for about a week, I finally glued it onto the far end of Somepony New, bringing my two-chapter, 6000-word epiclet to four chapters and 9000 words. Obviously planning is not my strong suit.

The demand for TwiBrush is more than I ever anticipated. (Then again, I never anticipated any demand.) Two storylines suggest themselves. One of them, the inevitable wedding, does not strike me as promising, since things would have to happen to rain on their parade, and let’s face it, nopony is going to top the changeling invasion that day in Canterlot.

That leaves something a bit more clinical. Brush, of course, was originally a human — presumably you knew that from The Sparkle Chronicles — and when the story picks up in Somepony New, he’s already been ponified and turned loose by the authorities. I’m thinking, then, that the period from Twilight’s return to the human world to take him back, through his extended sojourn in the Royal Canterlot Hospital to become a pony, might be of interest. I’ll have to mull this over for some time before it starts looking like an actual narrative.

Okay, maybe once

Back in July, I suggested that I had no inclination towards writing anything particularly cloppy, and truth be told, I hadn’t read anything that spicy and had no urge to.

Still, somepony I follow on FIMFiction came up with the notion of putting out a story and a clop scene separately, and I figured it wouldn’t hurt to see what was done.

And while it suffered from most of the same issues as human stories of this type — pony anatomy, like human anatomy, is fairly well standardized, and efforts to avoid repetitiveness usually end up in deepest Thesaurusville — I have to give the author credit for at least showing a couple with genuine affection for one another, and letting that affection shape their, um, moves. He got an upraised thumb for his trouble, you may be sure.

We are driven

There’s a reference to “pony cars” in The Sparkle Chronicles, in the context of not wanting to explain the concept to a visiting pony. No big deal. Then there’s this seemingly unrelated bit from Somepony New:

“Seriously, Dashie,” Pinkie insisted. “He doesn’t sit like a pony, he doesn’t walk like a pony, and nopony has ever heard of him. Suppose he’s not a pony at all?”

Compare and contrast with the review of the 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 2.0T R-Spec by Michael Karesh on the blog The Truth About Cars:

Yet it remains unclear what the Genesis Coupe wants to be when it grows up. Many reviews compare the car to a Mustang or a Camaro. But the Gen Coupe doesn’t look like a pony, sit like a pony, walk like a pony, or talk like a pony. It’s not a pony.

There’s no reason to think Mr Karesh actually read any part of Somepony New, but I have to admit to finding this hilarious.

(Crossposted to FIMFiction.)

Now what?

Somepony New has been declared Completed, and it’s about time: the darn thing wound up one chapter and 2700 words longer than I’d originally anticipated.

I have no idea where I’m going next. I have one story idea, but it has “Don’t go there” written all over it.

And furthermore

I have actually come up with a fragment of a smidgen of the germ of an idea for a follow-up story to The Sparkle Chronicles. I don’t have enough material for a whole chapter yet, but I have a reasonable launching point.

Update, 30 August: Launching point now open. Somepony New is now up to about a thousand words. More will follow.

Update, 3 September: It’s done. Two Three chapters, a bit over 6000 words. Submission to FIMFiction is imminent.

Scribes at work

On the off-chance that you might be interested, here’s a thread at FIMFiction in which I try to explain to a couple of fans — praise Celestia, I seem to have actual fans — what the hay I was thinking with those two stories I wrote.

Are stallions obsolete?

New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd once wrote a book called Are Men Necessary? (Did I read it? Well, yes.) This weekend there’s an op-ed in the Times called “Men, Who Needs Them?” by one Greg Hampikian, professor of biology and criminal justice at Boise State University and the director of the Idaho Innocence Project.

I would suggest to Ms. Dowd and to Dr. Hampikian that they might want to take some extended vacation time in the land of Equestria, where the male/female ratio at birth is officially unstated — I speculated 40/100 in chapter 4 of The Sparkle Chronicles — and where stallions are apparently both prized for their rarity (no pun intended) and ignored for most everything else. Worldwide ponification is just a matter of time.

New(ish) story

You may have already noticed something else that WordPress considers a page rather than a post. And yes, it’s a story: Dead Pony Flying is a brief (2000 words or so) tale I knocked off in two and a half sessions and am still tuning. The title, of course, is a dead (sorry) giveaway.

Update, 19 August: It’s probably not going to get too much better than it is, so I’ve submitted it to FIMFiction as a one-shot.

Go cry, emo pony

For some reason, I felt compelled to explain My Little Dashie to a coworker today. (Having the poster for one of the film versions hanging in the office will lead to such things.)

And I completely and utterly lost it. I mean, we’re talking a whole rack of bawls.

So if you saw something here, or elsewhere, with my name on it, and you thought it was overly emotional — well, I come by it naturally.

A different angle

If you just can’t get enough of Ordinary Guy Falls Hard for Twilight Sparkle and you don’t feel like waiting for me to conjure up something resembling a sequel to The Sparkle Chronicles, allow me to recommend My Little Earth: Human’s Are Special by Skyler Walker, which so far has been received well by FIMFiction readers. It’s not the same story by any means — Twilight in this version gets transmogrified into human form, thereby reducing the Squick Potential — but there are a couple of vaguely similar scenes. And Skyler, unlike me, was wise enough not to put too many constraints on where his story could go.

He says at the beginning:

I do hope you enjoy this offering. I don’t want flames, but if you have criticism I’ll gladly take it, if only to improve. If this isn’t your cup of tea, then I understand. Still, thank you for taking a moment to look.

If you liked The Sparkle Chronicles — or even if you didn’t like The Sparkle Chronicles — by all means, give this story a look. And pay no attention to the misplaced apostrophe in the title. We can’t all be copy editors.